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Wedding Ideas

My Trio Rings Blog provides useful information about how to experience the timeless traditions of marriage on an affordable budget

Blog entries categorized under Informational

Engagement Etiquette 101: Do’s and Don’ts

by Gillian Burgess Tuesday, 24 March 2015 Informational

engagement-etiquette Congratulations! You are newly engaged. You might feel both giddy with excitement and a bit overwhelmed as you are sharing your news and planning your wedding. Here are a few basic engagement etiquette tips to set you on the right track.

Engagement Do’s and Don’ts

 

Do
Tell your family about your engagement before posting on social media.

Believe me: your mom will be livid if she sees your diamond engagement ring selfie on Facebook before you tell her yourself. It’s normal to want to shout the news from the mountaintops… but tell your family first. If you can, share the news in person. If not, call, Skype or FaceTime them. Then get in touch with rest of your inner circle: grandma, your siblings, your closest friends. Now you’re free to broadcast the news to your wider circle of friends on social media - and enjoy the excitement and congratulations.

Don’t
Talk incessantly about your upcoming wedding in front of people who won’t be invited.

It’s natural to be enthusiastic about getting married, especially when wedding planning is going to be taking up a lot of your time and energy. But be conscious of who you are gushing to about the diamond engagement ring, the reception venue and the wedding party attire. It would be impolite to talk an acquaintance’s ear off about all your plans if you have no intention of inviting her to the wedding. Keep your sharing to a minimum in front of those not on the guest list, and save yourself some awkward questions down the road. This goes for social media posting as well!

Do
Ask your bridesmaids and groomsmen to be part of the wedding early.

Once you start planning your wedding, make your list of attendants one of your earliest decisions as a couple. You’ll want to ask your bridesmaids and groomsmen with plenty of notice. Share any details and logistics you have already - location, tentative dates, attire, any costs you’ll be covering, etc. - and let them know that you’d be honored if they can do it but you will understand if they can’t for any reason.

Don’t
Feel that you have to have an engagement party.

Plenty of couples want to celebrate their engagement with a party with friends and family, but plenty opt out of this event. If your parents are dying to host a party as soon as you announce your news, go for it and enjoy yourselves. If it seems like another expensive item on your to-do list that you’re not looking forward to, skip it and save your energy for wedding planning.

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8 Easy Ways to Save Money on Your Wedding

by Gillian Burgess Tuesday, 17 March 2015 Informational

wedding-planning-tips At My Trio Rings, we firmly believe that you can plan the wedding of your dreams - from the guest list and the menu to the diamond trio ring sets and the flower arrangements - without cleaning out your savings.

You and your future spouse want to celebrate a life-changing milestone with the people who are most important to you, but you also don’t want to start your marriage carrying a huge financial burden. Here are a few planning tips to help you save money on your wedding without feeling like you’re missing out on anything.

Budget Wedding Planning Tips

1. Shop trio ring sets - which include an engagement ring, a women’s wedding band and a men’s wedding band - to save up to 65% off retail.

2. Plan a wedding outside of the peak spring, summer or holiday season. Ask the venues you are interested in what time of year is most affordable. You may find that shortening or lengthening your timeline can help keep costs down.

3. Set a firm guest list number, based on your budget, and stick to it. It’ll be tempting to let the number keep inching up, but hold firm and save yourself future headaches.

4. Think outside the Saturday evening schedule. This is usually peak time for weddings and other events, so price out Friday nights or Sunday afternoons instead.

5. Choose flowers that are in season and available locally to cut down on shipping costs. Use more greenery and fewer flowers for striking - but more affordable - centerpieces.

6. Question the extras that tend to add up in a wedding - the champagne toast, the favors, the top-shelf full bar, the sit-down dinner. Ask yourselves which you have your heart set on and which aren’t important. Cut the latter.

7. Look at different photography package and shooter options at the studio you choose. Sometimes the principal photographer charges significantly more than an associate photographer who will also take beautiful pictures.

8. Keep your wedding party small. You’ll have fewer people to coordinate, and you won’t have as many expenses such as bouquets, attendant gifts and hair and makeup costs.

Shop trio ring sets that are ideal for your style and your budget

 

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Wedding Etiquette Tips: How to Plan a Child-Free Wedding

by Gillian Burgess Thursday, 05 March 2015 Informational

child-free-wedding Wedding planning can sometimes be an exercise in walking on eggshells, trying not to hurt feelings or step on toes, while still staying true to what you want as a couple.

One of the big questions that can cause the most controversy is: do we invite children or not?

There are many reasons you might want an adult-only celebration. For example, you are planning a glamorous black-tie wedding that wouldn’t be well suited to little ones, or you want to keep the guest list on the small side to keep the catering bill down. It is perfectly acceptable to decide to have a child-free wedding, but it can be a touchy subject with friends and family you’re inviting.

Here are a few wedding etiquette tips on how to handle the situation both clearly and gracefully:

Address the invitations carefully.


Writing “adults only” or “no children” on the invitation can come across as impolite and may ruffle feathers. Instead, address the invitation envelopes with care, writing, “Mr. Tom Figueroa” or “Ms. Amy Schmidt-Fuller and Mr. John Fuller,” without including the children’s names or “and family.” People should gather that it’s not a kid-friendly event, but if you are worried there will be confusion, ask your inner circle of family and wedding party members to spread the word in a subtle way to the wider guest list.

Plan an evening wedding.


It’s more challenging to host a child-free wedding at a daytime or more casual event. If you plan an evening wedding, particularly if it is a formal affair, it is easier to explain to friends and family why kids aren’t invited.

Arrange child-care services.


If you are having an adult-only wedding, especially if many people are traveling to it from out of town, it is a generous gesture to arrange to have a babysitter (or small team of sitters) take care of the kids while the adults have fun.

Be consistent.


Inviting some children and not others can cause problems, so it’s best to pick a rule and stick with it. For example, you may want your sister’s son to be the ring bearer in charge of presenting the trio ring sets at the ceremony, so you could invite kids from your immediate family only. But to avoid hurt feelings, you should hold fast to this rule and not make exceptions.


Browse our trio ring sets

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Should You Buy Wedding Insurance?

by Gillian Burgess Thursday, 26 February 2015 Informational

outdoor-wedding You have a lot of big - and often big-ticket - decisions to make when you are planning your wedding. Some are easier than others - who to include in your wedding party, which bridal ring sets are perfect for your style, what song to play for your first dance - but others are nuanced and complex. One big question for couples is: should we buy wedding insurance to protect against unforeseen crises?

What is Wedding Insurance?

The average cost of a wedding in the US in 2014 was around $28,000 - a significant amount for most couples. Wedding insurance safeguards this investment in case something outside your control forces you to change, postpone or cancel your big day, or you suffer property damage or loss.

What Does Wedding Insurance Cost?

Policies vary depending on their coverage, but most won’t be more than about $500 for basic protection. Insurance companies like Fireman’s Fund and Travelers offer customizable options for different fees.

What Does Wedding Insurance Cover?

Again, policies vary widely, so be sure to ask questions and read the fine print, but these are some common wedding insurance coverage options:

Extreme Weather: If you have to postpone your wedding because of a hurricane or blizzard, for example, the policy should cover the rescheduling costs.

Missing Vendor or Officiant: If someone essential to the wedding - your caterer, priest or rabbi, for example - goes out of business or doesn’t show up, you should be able to be reimbursed for the cost of postponement.

Illness, Injury or Bereavement: If there is a death in the family or someone involved in the wedding - a close family member or member of the wedding party - suddenly falls ill or is injured, you should be able to reschedule and recoup some of the costs.

Site Problems: Check with your wedding location to see if it has its own insurance, but if not, wedding insurance should be able to cover costs associated with unavoidable cancellation. For example, there is an electrical fire in the kitchen at the reception venue or the wedding site closes unexpectedly the week before your ceremony.

Wedding Attire and Jewelry: If your wedding gown and tuxedo or bridal ring sets or matching wedding bands are lost, stolen or damaged, the policy should pay to replace or repair them.

Liability: Most sites have liability insurance, but if you are having your wedding at someone’s home, this would protect you in case a guest were to be injured at the wedding.

Military Service: If the bride or groom is active duty or reserve status and suddenly has to leave because of work, the policy should pay for the expenses due to rescheduling.

Note: Cancelling a wedding due to cold feet is not usually covered. Fireman’s Fund has a “change of heart” policy you can opt for, but it only applies if someone calls off the wedding 365 days before the first covered event.

Do We Really Need Wedding Insurance?

It’s ultimately a personal decision and one you should make as a couple - along with parents or anyone else helping to pay for your wedding. If you are having a very small budget wedding, you may not feel you need insurance. But if you are spending a moderate sum or more on your wedding, a few hundred extra dollars for a bit of peace of mind may be well worth it.

Invest in affordable and beautiful bridal ring sets

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Valentine’s Day Proposal Do’s and Don’ts

by Gillian Burgess Thursday, 22 January 2015 Informational

valentines-day-proposal Valentine’s Day is coming up next month, which is both a romantic and popular day to pop the question. You might worry that it’s too predictable to propose on a holiday, but you can still make it your own. If you want to plan a Valentine’s Day proposal, here are a few tips on how to make it memorable and heartfelt… and how to avoid the cheesy cliches.

Do
Put some thought into it. Yes, Valentine’s Day is inherently full of romance, but you will still want to plan something thoughtful. Think about what you want to say to her, what place will be most meaningful to her and which diamond engagement ring she will love.

Don’t
Go overboard. This may seem contradictory, but you don’t need to kill yourself choreographing a flash mob or hiring a skywriting airplane to plan the perfect Valentine’s Day proposal. If you find yourself stressing out about every detail or trying to plan the best moment of her life, take a step back. What matters is that you two want to spend the rest of your lives together. The rest is just confetti. Simplify how you ask so you don’t lose your message in theatrics.

Do
Try to find a way to surprise her. It’s a tricky day to plan a proposal without her picking up on clues, so look for opportunities to catch her off guard (in a good way). Ask her best friend what might be a good diversion - for example, planning a romantic dinner at your favorite restaurant but adding a surprise stop she doesn’t know about before or after. Get down on one knee with a diamond engagement ring in the place where you first met or at a quiet spot looking over the city.

Don’t
Be afraid of enlisting help. If you are having a hard time planning your proposal all on your own, don’t hesitate to ask a few trusted friends for their advice or help in putting it all together. They will probably be thrilled to be in on such a wonderful event, and you’ll be able to rest easy knowing you don’t have to do everything yourself.

Do
Create a happy memory. This is a story everyone will want to hear - from her grandma to your next door neighbor from childhood. Make it a sweet, positive and PG story she’ll be happy to tell all who ask.

Browse our diamond engagement ring and wedding ring specials

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